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Overlooked Causes of Calcium Deposits

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mixed leafy green vegetables in a bowl
  Vitamin K, found in leafy green vegetables, may be protective against some types of calcification.

Question: I have calcium deposits in the tips of my fingers and thumbs and other places in my body. I could not find anything anything on your site regarding the subject. If I have missed it would you please tell me where I can find this kind of information.

Answer: I am aware of several possible dietary causes of calcium deposits. These are:

  • vitamin D toxicity
  • magnesium deficiency
  • vitamin K deficiency may be linked to arterial calcification

Many holistic doctors believe magnesium deficiencies are common and responsible for many common disorders, including calcium deposits. If you have other conditions linked to magnesium deficiency such as fibromyalgia, tight muscles, mitral valve prolapse, heart palpitations, anxiety disorder, allergies, headaches, migraines and/or TMJ, you may want to consider if you are ingesting (and absorbing) enough magnesium. (See my site map for more information on all of these conditions and the links to nutrition.)

Symptoms of Vitamin K Deficiencies - One of the main conditions linked to a vitamin K deficiency is bleeding problems - hematuria (blood in the urine), bleeding gums, heavy menstrual periods, easy bruising, nose bleeds, etc.) So if you have both calcium deposits and bleeding problems, a vitamin K deficiency would be a logical possibility to consider as a common root cause.

For information on calcium deposits and too much vitamin D, see this article at: http://www.slate.com .

Calcification and Nanobacteria

Though a controversial idea, some researchers believe nanobacteria may be a cause of calcification within the body.

In my own family's experience, one of my sons had problems with heartburn for awhile and was taking a lot of Tums, which contain calcium carbonate. The next new adult tooth he had come in had a calcium deposit on it - the only tooth he's ever had with a white splotch on it like that. We cut out the Tums after seeing that, and the rest of of his adult teeth came in looking normal.

In his case the answer seemed obvious - he had a calcium deposit from ingesting too much calcium. I don't know if his experience would apply to other people, or if it would apply to deposits that people get in places other than teeth, but it may be information worth considering.

 

 

 

 

 

Related sections of interest:

Treating MVP Symptoms with Diet

An Overlooked Cause of Heart Palpitations

What Causes Mitro Valve Prolapse (MVP)?

 

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